Currently showing

  • Exhibition view

    Exhibition view

    Credit: Olga Cafiero
     
  • Humans since 1982, Surveillance Chandelier, 2011

    Humans since 1982, Surveillance Chandelier, 2011

    Credit: Tim Meier
     
  • Exhibition view

    Exhibition view

    Credit: Olga Cafiero
     
  • Exhibition view

    Exhibition view

    Credit: Olga Cafiero
     
  • Lucy + Jorge Orta , Urban Life Guard - Ambulatory Sleeping Linen, 2002

    Lucy + Jorge Orta , Urban Life Guard - Ambulatory Sleeping Linen, 2002

    Credit: JJ Crance
     
  • Studio GGSV (Gaëlle Gabillet & Stéphane Villard), Radar Roche (Collection Power Stones), 2015

    Studio GGSV (Gaëlle Gabillet & Stéphane Villard), Radar Roche (Collection Power Stones), 2015

    Credit: Samy Rio
     
  • SUPERLIFE design studio (Edrris Gaaloul & Cyrille Verdon), Poumon, 2015

    SUPERLIFE design studio (Edrris Gaaloul & Cyrille Verdon), Poumon, 2015

    Credit: SUPERLIFE design studio
     
  • Exhibition view

    Exhibition view

    Credit: Olga Cafiero
     

From March 23, 2016
to August 21, 2016

Safe and Sound
Protection and surveillance in 21st century

Today's society is full of instructions and mandatory actions relating to safety or the anticipation of danger. Countless security instructions detail procedures to avoid any risk in the public space while double door entrances control access to a growing number of places. Our faces, bodies, fingerprints and pupils are repeatedly scanned. Western society is moving towards ultra-security, towards a refusal of the unexpected and an absolute desire for anticipation.

The Safe and sound exhibition addresses this phenomenon through design, objects from everyday life, photography and contemporary art in four themes: security, fear, protection and surveillance. Mixing objects that meet a specific need for protection and the points of view of designers and artists, more critical and distanced but not devoid of humour, Safe and sound provides an exciting insight into this facet of our society.

  • Exhibition view

    Exhibition view

    Credit: Delphine Schacher
     
  • Exhibition view

    Exhibition view

    Credit: Delphine Schacher
     
  • Benjamin Ben Kemoun - avec Praiya Chinagarn, Andrea Rovescalli et Guillaume Vautier, Once ...

    Benjamin Ben Kemoun - avec Praiya Chinagarn, Andrea Rovescalli et Guillaume Vautier, Once Upon a Tale, Conte pour enfants sur iPad, 2013

    Credit: Editions volumiques
     
  • Exhibition view

    Exhibition view

    Credit: Olga Cafiero
     
  • Ma Mère. Text by Stéphane Servant and illustrations by Emmanuelle Houdart

    Ma Mère. Text by Stéphane Servant and illustrations by Emmanuelle Houdart

    Credit: © Editions Thierry Magnier, 2015.
     
  • Exhibition view

    Exhibition view

    Credit: Delphine Schacher
     
  • Exhibition view

    Exhibition view

    Credit: Delphine Schacher
     
  • David Calvo et les Éditions Volumiques, Bande dessinée/promenade interactive sur iPad ...

    David Calvo et les Éditions Volumiques, Bande dessinée/promenade interactive sur iPad, 2013

    Credit: David Calvo et les Éditions Volumiques
     
  • Exhibition view

    Exhibition view

    Credit: Olga Cafiero
     

From March 23, 2016
to August 21, 2016

What will we read?
Reading in all its forms

Mudac is pleased to present the first exhibition on reading... without any books! Realising that reading, far from disappearing, is a pleasure that is now available in multiple and unexpected forms, What will we read? is an ode to the joy of reading, inspired by writer Daniel Pennac's 10 rights of the reader. Stories hide in whispering cushions, take us into virtual and immersive worlds, are enriched by smells and materials and reveal their secrets under our eyes or fingers after decoding and interaction.

Created by industrial designer Nicolas Le Moigne in collaboration with the mudac team, this exhibition features ten interactive installations that bring to life stories in poetic, facetious or exciting forms, into which we are immersed, whether standing, sitting or lying down. Far from proclaiming the end of the paper book as we know it, the exhibition celebrates the joy of discovery and imagination, in words and pictures. Designed for those who enjoy reading, it is particularly aimed at young audiences.

  • Vogt & Weizenegger, Dyonisos' Stomach, 2003

    Vogt & Weizenegger, Dyonisos' Stomach, 2003

    Credit: Cédric Bregnard
     
  • Julie Alland, Talisman-Sweetheart, 2005

    Julie Alland, Talisman-Sweetheart, 2005

    Credit: Julie Alland
     
  • Yves Netzhammer, Flower-Liquidity in a Space Full of Time, 2003

    Yves Netzhammer, Flower-Liquidity in a Space Full of Time, 2003

    Credit: Cédric Bregnard
     
  • Etienne Meneau, Strange Carafe #6

    Etienne Meneau, Strange Carafe #6

    Credit: Etienne Meneau
     
  • Coupe d’accouchée, début 20e siècle. Collection Musée Valaisan de la vigne ...

    Coupe d’accouchée, début 20e siècle. Collection Musée Valaisan de la vigne et du vin

    Credit: MVVV/R. Hofer
     
  • Mariken Dumon, Wine Red Perfume – Atlas, 2011

    Mariken Dumon, Wine Red Perfume – Atlas, 2011

    Credit: Lieven Herreman
     
  • Matali Crasset, Bouteille à la croix, 2008

    Matali Crasset, Bouteille à la croix, 2008

    Credit: AN - Marie Humair
     
  • Pieke Bergmans, Water II Caraf, 2011

    Pieke Bergmans, Water II Caraf, 2011

    Credit: AN - Arnaud Conne
     
  • ECAL/Elsa Lambinet, Stretch, 2011

    ECAL/Elsa Lambinet, Stretch, 2011

    Credit: ECAL/Julien Chavaillaz
     

From November 18, 2015
to June 5, 2016

This is not a bottle !

Collaboration with the Musée valaisan de la vigne et du vin in Sierre Wine has always been an important part of Switzerland's history, and remains so today. The two museums accordingly decided to investigate the containers that carry the precious beverage from the cellar to the table. The intention is not to recount the history and usage of the glass bottle, but to map out the relationship between these functional receptacles and contemporary glass design.
Although design plays around with function and utility, the interest of museum pieces lies precisely in the fact that they are no longer used! Selected objects are staged in a way that emphasises this paradox, showcasing the different aspects of the bottle today and, by association, sketching an outline of historical drinkers and their contemporary counterparts. This is not a bottle explores the many facets of the bottle, including functionality, industrial design and creative expression.